IELTS Frequently Asked Questions

Can you tell me about the Writing band scores/assessment criteria?

In the IELTS writing test, there are four main criteria, each worth 25%. There's grammar range and accuracy, and also vocabulary, which is similar to the IELTS speaking test. However, there's also task response or task achievement and coherence and cohesion. So look at how well you answer the question. Make sure you finish all the criteria, your paragraphing, your linking devices and connectors, these are all important things.

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How to best prepare for a wide variety of speaking topics?

I know it sounds funny, but I used to practice giving little speeches to myself about everyday stuff. So most IELTS questions are going to be about everyday topics. So for example, I got how would I organize a trip for my family and my friends, which is something that I really enjoy doing anyway. So my advice would be try to practice those little speeches as you do regular things in day, like, okay, how I cooked my dinner or how I got home today or what happened to me today. So you can practice sentences and speaking in general.

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Should I try to speak slowly or quickly in my Speaking test?

Now, if you're worried about the speed of your speech in the IELTS speaking test, I think it's not a good idea to speak quite fast or quite slow. And the reason for that is it's important to look at your rhythm, intonation and stress. If you're speaking too fast or too slow. That could also affect your pronunciation score. My advice is just to speak at a normal, constant pace.

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Common pronunciation mistakes (V vs W)

Pronunciation of the letter w starts from the sound U and the letter v starts from sound V. Honestly, for Russians, there is no difference in sound, but for native speakers, there are big differences. West, which starts from w, and vest, which starts from v. Again. West vest. West vest. That's it.

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How to learn new and interesting words?

Hello, everyone. Sometimes you need more vocabulary for the IELTS test. So how would you learn better and interesting new words for the test? So first of all, read, okay. I would suggest creating a reading habit, at least one to two pages of english books or newspaper articles a week. Second of all, listen to scientific subjects, okay? I would, as TED talk about one to two videos. TED videos a week. Okay. And when you watch the video, write down the new words. Okay. The words that you don't understand the meaning, as well as words that you feel that will be useful for the test. Okay. And then read those words again. I hope you can do best on your test.

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Made a mistake during IELTS Speaking?

Hello, everyone. Sometimes we make mistakes. And when we do, when we take the IELTS speaking test, we might mispronounce a few words. So what should we do? So first of all, do not stammer. Do not be like, oh, I mean, okay, don't do that. Okay. It's very uncomfortable. So what should you do? It's okay. If you make a mistake, remain calm and tell the examiner, I'm sorry, I have made a mistake. Allow me to correct myself. Okay. Or if just you, or if you just mispronounce one word. Okay, you can repeat it again. It's okay. Be calm and you can do it.

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Is it okay to ask a Speaking examiner to repeat a question?

Some people are very worried about asking the examiner to repeat a question in the IELTS speaking test. They worry that they might lose marks. But in fact, it's perfectly okay to ask for clarification on a question. It doesn't matter if it's part one, part two, or part three. If you need them to repeat it, please ask them.

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What is the best way to prepare for the IELTS test?

Well, this is really dependent on you. For example, if you're currently a five but you need a 7.5, it's going to take you longer to get your score than a six. Also, it depends on how much time you can spend studying per day. Students must be studying for 2 hours per day. Studying regularly and being consistent will help you improve quicker. So the general rule is that with two or 3 hours of regular studying, most students will move one grade band in five to six weeks. If you have a six at the moment and you need a seven, five to six weeks would be sufficient amount of time to achieve it.

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Common pronunciation mistakes (Off vs Of)

Don't forget about the differences in pronunciation between off and of. Off. Of. Of is spoken with v sound and off with an f. There is a big difference.

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What can I do to speed up my learning of English?

What can I do to speed up my learning of English? It's better to learn the language every day, but little by little than learn it for a whole hour but once or twice a week. I learn English every day for 20 minutes at least. And what speeds up my learning process is that all my devices have been translated into English. Trying to immerse myself in a language environment, that's it.

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What is the best way to prepare for IELTS Writing?

What is the best way to practise and prepare for the IELTS writing? in both parts of the exam, it is important that you use a variety of sentence structures. the key word being variety, which means you don't have to use complex sentences all the time, but rather a mix of sentences. Try to use simple sentences, compound sentences and complex sentences. Now, when you are practising, try to break the test down. Don't always write a full essay. It can be very, or it can be more beneficial if you write individual paragraphs, because you can focus on the aim of that paragraph, which could be the introduction, the conclusion, expressing your opinion, the opposite opinion and so on.

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What is the best way to prepare for IELTS Reading?

What's the best way to practise and prepare for the IELTS Reading? well, it may be obvious, but you need to read a lot. However, the reading exam is set up to test how well you can identify important information. Therefore, it is also important that you are closely analysing the text that you are reading. For example, find an article that you enjoy as you are reading take notes of what you think is important information. Also, you can write a couple of words to summarise each paragraph. Doing this will improve your analytical skills, which will be useful in the exam. Remember, in the exam there are 14 different types of questions. Familiarise yourself with these questions and use different strategies to save you time.

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What is the best way to prepare for IELTS Listening?

This is very important to think about when choosing what to listen to on the Internet or on TV. To be honest, TED talks are great for practising listening to monologues. You can also select topics and focus on them as well as choosing the length of the video. I recommend to listening to videos of one to six minutes. Nothing too long. If you want to improve your listening skills for conversations, podcasts are very useful. BBC 'six minute English' is ideal for lower level students and 'in our time' is for high level students who are aiming for 7.5 or over. Of course, make sure you are listening to different accents. The test includes accents from the UK, Ireland, the USA, New Zealand, Australia and even South Africa.

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What if I don't have an opinion on a topic in IELTS Speaking?

If you're asked a question in the IELTS speaking test and you can't form an opinion or don't have an opinion about the question or the topic, you're still expected to say something. So perhaps you can speculate if they ask you something about taking a ferry, for example, as a type of public transport, and you've never done that before, you could speculate and explain to the examiner, well, look, I've never been on a ferry before, but I imagine it would be like this. So use your language and speculate. If you don't have an opinion.

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Is it preferable to write more than the word limit?

If you want to write over the word minimum in the IELTS writing test, that is more than 150 words in task one and more than 250 words in task two. That's perfectly fine, especially if you're wanting to achieve a higher band score, like band seven or band eight, where you want to show the examiner more range in your language choices. However, just make sure that you've got a good quality in your writing as well. So volume does not mean, always mean a higher band score. You also need quality as well.

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What are True, False and Not given questions?

True, false or not given? An interesting group of questions, aren't they? Especially the not given response. My advice is to not focus on the not given choice to begin with, just look at the true or false option first. If the answer is true, then the information in the article matches the sentence. For the answer to be false, it has to contradict the sentence opposite or different. In the case of not given, this is your last option, I feel, when you cannot prove if the statement is correct or incorrect. So basically there's no evidence to say whether it's true or false.

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Words that will always come in useful for an IELTS test?

Hello everyone. So these are some words that will be quite useful in the IELTS test. So you can use these to break down your speech or your text. Okay? So you can use, 'first of all', 'second of all', 'finally'. Or you can use 'firstly', 'secondly', 'in conclusion'. If you want to give an example, okay, you can use 'as an example', 'for example', 'case in point', 'to prove my point'. Okay, I hope you can put them to good use in your test.

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What if the examiner interrupts me?

If an examiner interrupts you in the IELTS speaking test, it's perfectly fine. There's no need to panic. The examiner has to stick to a very strict schedule. So, for example, in part one of the IELTS speaking test, it's strictly no more than five minutes. So they just perhaps want to move on to the next stage. Sometimes, if you've given a full response to a question, perhaps they might want to move on and ask you something else and get some other ideas that you have.

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Do you have any advice for Writing Task 2

When it comes to task two in the IELTS writing test, some suggestions I have for you would be to ensure, first of all, that you write at least 250 words. That's the minimum requirement. Make sure that you write in paragraphs and use a good range of connectors. Make sure your grammar is complex, as accurate as you can, and use a good range of vocabulary. Importantly, when it comes to the task, make sure that you clearly mark your position and extend and develop your ideas.

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Do you have any advice for IELTS Listening?

In the IELTS listening test, there are four sections. Two of the sections have dialogues and two of the sections have monologues. So in your listening practise you can listen to things like news, which are monologues, or perhaps practise your listening with television shows and tv dramas where people are interacting with each other.

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What's meant by 'Task response' in IELTS Writing?

One of the key features of the task response criteria in the IELTS writing test, especially for the higher bands, is about how well you develop your ideas and opinions, using examples to extend and develop your thoughts. Also in this criteria, this is where people perhaps, maybe would lose marks. For example, if you are off topic, or perhaps if your word length is not enough, you would have marks deducted here.

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What's meant by ‘Grammatical range and accuracy’ criteria in IELTS Speaking?

The grammatical range and accuracy criteria in the IELTS speaking test is worth 25% of your score. So here we're looking at not just your accuracy, that is, with the errors that you make or the type of errors that you make, but it's also important to have a good variety of structures. Don't repeat yourself too much. Also, make sure that your sentences are complex as well, especially if you are looking for a higher band score.

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What's meant by 'Lexical resource' in IELTS Speaking?

The lexical resource criteria in the IELTS speaking test is very similar to the writing criteria actually. We look for things like your range of vocabulary, the collocations that you use, and whether the language you use is common or uncommon. And it's also important here not to try to repeat a lot of the vocabulary as well. Show a good range.

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What to study in the lead up to your IELTS test?

If you're wondering what to study in the days leading up to your IELTS test, you can try some IELTS practise test materials if you like, but you can do other things that are not related to IELTS as well. And make sure that you're using English in the days leading up to your test, so that way it'll help you to think in English. So to read, speak, listen and write in English.

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Can you explain the ‘Pronunciation’ criteria in IELTS Speaking?

When it comes to the pronunciation criteria in the IELTS speaking test, some people think it's just about the sounds making the right sounds in English, but that's only part of it. You also have to make sure that you focus on your rhythm and intonation and also look at your word and sentence stress as well.

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What's meant by 'Lexical resource' in IELTS Writing?

The lexical resource criteria in the IELTS writing test focuses on your vocabulary use, so to achieve a higher band you need to make sure that you use a good range of vocabulary. Try to use words that are perhaps less common or more formal or academic. Also, think about your collocation, that is, words that belong together. For example, you could say something like have a preference for these four words together, make a collocation. So that's some of the things that we look at in the lexical resource criteria.

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How to practice reading faster for IELTS?

I think this one is about practise makes perfect. For IELTS reading what's most important is that you read the text with understanding, as if you were asked to retell the story that you've read to someone else. Try to understand what are the main points of the text, as most questions ask you to take some conclusions out of what you've read. Of course, you can always go back to the text, especially if it's about some specific names or dates, numbers, years. But try to take text as a whole rather than a bunch of individual sentences.

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How to score Band 6 in IELTS?

If you're aiming to achieve a band six in the IELTS test, at this level, you are expected to be able to develop your ideas and thoughts in an extended way. For example, in the writing, being able to fully develop your ideas, and the same in speaking. When it comes to the listening and the reading tests, you need to be able to read at a good speed to be able to cover all the articles in the exam within the 1 hour.

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What sort if questions will I receive in IELTS Speaking Part 3?

In part three of the IELTS speaking test, the type of questions you would expect would not be personal type like you would find in part one or part two. These are more abstract questions, looking at topics and issues more deeply. So, for example, you might be asked to offer your opinion about something, perhaps talk about the advantages and disadvantages of a particular issue, or even the cause or the reason behind a trend, or the effect of it, or even a solution to a problem, even identifying particular aspects of an issue as well.

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Do you have any advice for IELTS Reading?

I guess my advice for the IELTS reading test, first of all, is perhaps to get familiar with all the different question typess. For example, matching headings or true false, not given multiple choice. If you're aware of all the different question types and become more familiar with those, then you can be more comfortable answering the questions. Also, it's a good idea to improve your reading speed. Try to read as much as you can. Try to read something every day, and also some practise tests are also helpful, but try to do some general reading as well.

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What can you tell me about Listening Part 4?

Section four of the IELTS listening test is the final part. There are also ten questions here. This time it is a lecture. It's a bit different to section two in that it is a talk on a very specialised topic or an academic topic. And there are a variety of questions here. You could be asked to answer multiple choice questions, for example, or even completing some notes or completing a table.

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What sort of questions will I receive in IELTS Speaking Part 2?

When it comes to the type of questions in part two of the IELTS speaking test, you'll find that they are still quite personal or relatable to yourself like it is in part one. You may be asked to describe a past experience, something that you went through before. You could be asked about something you do at the moment. It could be like a routine or a habit. You may be asked to describe a person that you knew or you know or you've heard of. And sometimes you might be asked about intentions or plans for the future.

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What is the best way to increase English vocabulary?

Hello everyone. People ask me what is the best way to improve my english vocabulary. Well, one of the most effective ways, scientifically proven to help you know more english words would be to read, okay, read a lot. Intensive reading. Okay, what should you read? Books, novels, stories, newspaper articles. Okay. And choose the topic that you love. For me it would be science fiction. Okay. And if you don't know where to look for reading materials, I would highly recommend Oxford bookworms. It is an amazing series of books of stories for english learners. You can absolutely start there.

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Where can I use Idioms in my IELTS test?

When it comes to using idioms in the IELTS test, it's perfectly fine to use it, say, in the speaking test, idioms can be quite useful because quite often they are very uncommon. But just make sure that the context is right. In the IELTS writing test, I think task one, in the general test, you may be asked to write a letter to a friend, in which case that's an informal task. So in this case it's okay to use idioms.

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Could I lose marks If I express an opinion different to the examiner?

In the IELTS speaking test, if you present an opinion that's different to what the examiner says or suggests that's perfectly fine. You don't lose marks for your opinions. You actually gain marks for things like fluency, vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. So don't worry about whether your opinion differs, just worry about the content and if it's relevant to the question.

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How to improve from Band 4 to 5 in IELTS Speaking?

To improve from a band four to a band five in the IELTS speaking test, there are a few things to take into consideration. First of all, with regards to your grammar, try to make sentences a bit more complex, but at least make sure that your basic sentence structures are fairly accurate. Watch out for basic common mistakes. Also, be prepared to try and develop and extend your ideas. Try not to hesitate and pause so often and also make sure that your pronunciation of the individual sounds of English are improved.

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What is the best way to prepare for IELTS Speaking?

The best way to practise or prepare for the speaking exam is to fully understand what you need to do in each part of the test and what type of questions can come up. Look online for past questions, for sections one, two and three, and record yourself answering them. You can listen back to the recording and analyse your mistakes. At first, you may be surprised by how many small mistakes you make without even realising it. This will help you to identify what mistakes you are making. Maybe they are grammatical or related to pronunciation, but once you start correcting yourself, you will improve quickly.

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What's meant by 'Fluency and coherence' in IELTS Speaking?

When it comes to the fluency and coherence criteria in the IELTS speaking test, there are a few things to look out for. First of all, this is where you need to try to develop and extend your ideas. We also look at things about your pausing and your hesitation when you're searching for words. This is also the section where we look at connectors and cohesive devices as well.

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How can I speak more like a native speaker?

How can I speak more like a native speaker? My general advice is to try to emulate the language speakers by parroting their speech from movies, serials, blogs, songs and podcasts. That's what I did. I picked a song, turned it on, opened it and read it with the singer. I repeated their way of speaking, pronunciation and accent. But in songs, performers can make many grammatical mistakes for rhyme. Pay attention. The same way works with movies. I'm russian and that's what helped me.

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Are there points for accent?

When it comes to accent in the IELTS speaking test, don't worry if you use an american accent or a british accent or an australian accent. I guess the main thing is to just try to be consistent. English has no standard accent, so that's perfectly fine if you have one particular accent from an english speaking country.

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How to improve from Band 6 to 7 in IELTS Writing?

Now, going from a band six in the IELTS writing test and trying to achieve a band seven there are a few things you need to think about. One is about how well you develop and extend your ideas. A band seven response to tends to be much more developed. You've got clear topic sentence in your body paragraphs, for example. And when it comes to grammar and vocabulary, you've got a wider range, especially with vocabulary that's less common.

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How to speak clearly during the IELTS Speaking test?

What can I do to speak more clearly during my IELTS speaking test? Don't rush it, but don't talk too slowly either. Speak as orderly as I am now. I also advise you to do a little workout before the speaking test. You can say a few tongue twisters. Let's do it right now. I thought a thought, but the thought I thought wasn't the thought I thought I thought. Once again I thought, I thought, but the thought I thought wasn't the thought I thought I thought the second one. There was a young fisher named Fischer who fished for a fish in a fissure. Once again, there was a young fisher named Fischer who fished for a fish in a fissure. That's it.

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How to improve from Band 8 to 9 in IELTS Speaking?

Now, moving from band eight to band nine in the IELTS speaking test does require a lot more work. You have to be able to fully develop your responses and talk about a variety of topics in depth. You have to have a good range of language in terms of vocabulary and grammar, and you also need a high accuracy rate when it comes to those two criteria. Make sure that your pronunciation has good rhythm, intonation, and stress, and that you pronounce all the sounds in English clearly, although it's fine to have a slight accent, but otherwise, these are all the kind of main things we look at in a band nine.

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What's meant by 'Coherence and cohesion' in IELTS Writing?

The coherence and cohesion criteria in the IELTS writing test is worth 25% of your score. It would look at things like paragraph development, for example, if you have a clear topic sentence also looks at connectors and cohesive devices. Do you repeat a lot of words or do you reference them? Use words like it, they or them? For example, it also looks at how well your ideas flow and continue throughout the response.

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What's meant by 'Grammatical range and accuracy' in IELTS Writing?

When it comes to the grammatical range and accuracy criteria in the IELTS writing test, it's very important to remember there are two aspects here. One is the accuracy in your grammar, but it's also important to think about the range of structures that you use. Try not to be repetitive. Make sure that your sentences are complex, especially if you want to achieve a higher band. But don't worry, it is okay to make some errors in the higher bands, but just be careful with the quantity of them that's all.

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What sort of questions will I receive in Speaking Part 1?

Now, the type of questions you would expect in part one of the IELTS speaking test are more about yourself. Personal questions or things that you are familiar about. You might be asked about something in your town or in your country or in your culture. So it could be something about things that you like, things that you prefer, how common something is, perhaps. And you would talk about perhaps two or three topics like that.

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Is IELTS more difficult than other English language tests?

It's really hard to say if one exam is more difficult than the other. Maybe another question to ask is one exam more accurate than another exam? At any rate, at least with the IELTS test, there are plenty of materials available for you to access and to become more familiar with. So that's perhaps one thing to think about, is how familiar can I be with the tasks and what is available for me to access.

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What can you tell me about Reading Part 1?

The part one reading in the IELTs reading test. In the general test, that is, they've got a lot of very shorter articles or advertisements that are perhaps separated, and it's a good idea to try and look at similar kind of texts in everyday life. For example, you can look at advertisements in a magazine or, or newspaper, perhaps, and get familiar with that kind of brief and short language. And also you'll find that the question types in part one are very similar. It can be true or false or not given or multiple choice as well.

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Common pronunciation mistakes (TH and S)

You must see the difference between th third and s in the pronunciation. Sometimes the pronunciation changes the meaning of the word. When you have to pronounce the th third sound, you have to put your tongue between your teeth and blow like. So that's it. That's the sound.

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How did you find your face-to-face Speaking test with the examiner?

I was actually really looking forward to my speaking part of IELTS because I knew that's where I'm the strongest. I was always really good with all oral types of exams and I had zero patience for all written on any other forms of exams. So try to think about your strengths, try to think about what's your biggest strength and try to look forward to it on the test day. Whether it may be writing, reading, listening or speaking, there must be something that you feel really good at and try to look forward to that part of the test.

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How to improve from Band 5 to 6 in IELTS Listening?

To improve from a band five to band six, in the IELTS listening test, it's important to try and practise as much general listening as you can. So, for example, listening to more monologues such as news broadcasts or TED talks, but also in conversations and dialogues as well. With band six, it's also important to be able to follow lectures at length and be able to concentrate for an extended period of time. So that's an important thing to do in your practise.

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How many words will I have to write for each task in IELTS Writing?

In the IELTS writing test, there is a word minimum that you are expected to produce. In task one, you need to write at least 150 words, whereas in task two you should write at least 250 words. Otherwise you can be penalised for not writing enough words. For the higher bands, I do recommend writing a little bit above that, just to show that you have a wider range of language.

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What can you tell me about Reading Part 2?

In part two of the IELTS reading test for the general paper, you'll have two articles, and they're both in a work related context. So if you're thinking about your preparation for this section, it's a good idea to look at work related articles. You can find these on the Internet or in magazines and get familiar with different kind of working contexts and some of the language there. And of course, the question types can be varied, can be headings, or can be any kind of matching task for example.

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Can you tell me about the Reading band scores/criteria?

When it comes to the band score in the IELTS reading test, it's very similar to the listening test in that you get a raw score out of 40 and that is converted into a band score. Although there is a difference between the IELTS general and academic tests in reading, in that you need a higher score in the general test to have the same band score as the academic test. So perhaps 25 out of 40 would give you a band six in the academic test, it would give you approximately 5.5 in the general test.

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Is Speaking Part 3 harder than Speaking Part 1 and 3?

Now, if you want to compare the difficulty between part three and part one of the IELTS speaking test, there can be a difference for some people because part one mainly focuses on personal experiences or very familiar topics, for example like public transport or your hometown. Part three, on the other hand, looks at topics a little bit more deeply, more abstract. So in some ways that can be more challenging, but at the same time, perhaps part one can be difficult as well. if you come across a topic that you haven't met before.

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What can you tell me about Reading Part 3?

In part three of the IELTS reading test, in the general paper, that is, this is one longer article on a general, everyday topic. Now, you don't need to have specialised knowledge in this article, but it's different to the other parts of the reading test in that it's a longer article, one piece, and again you get your various typical questions that you would normally get. It could be yes, no, not given, or locating information or matching information, something like that for example.

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Who accepts IELTS?

In the IELTS writing test, if you want to know which task is more difficult, task one or task two, it's really difficult to say because they're just basically different tasks. For some people they find writing about statistics and data quite challenging. But for some people it's easier in the essay. Some people are used to writing essays and discussing ideas, but for others they find that more of a challenge. So it really depends on the person.

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What can you tell me about Listening Part 2?

In section two of the IELTS listening test, there are ten questions again, and this time it's just the one speaker giving a short talk. The topic is of a general nature, something that you would be very familiar with. Unlike section four, which is on a more specialised topic, there are a variety of questions that you could answer, for example, multiple choice or even labelling a map.

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How to stay calm on your IELTS test day?

Sometimes it's better not to try and keep completely calm when there's a big event coming up. However, do your best to turn any potential anxiety into excitement, as you know that your IELTS will bring something positive and it will help you achieve something that you really want. If on the other hand, you're still really anxious. Take a few deep breaths and maybe a mantra like 'I can do this' can help you too.

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Is it possible to score an overall band 9?

To achieve a band nine in the IELTS test, you have to average at least 8.75 among your four skills. So, for example, if you received band nine for speaking, listening and reading, but band eight for writing, that average would be 8.75, so it would be rounded up to band nine. The similar thing is if you get two band nine scores and two 8.5 scores, it's still possible to get band nine.

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How to improve from Band 7 to 8 in IELTS Speaking?

An IELTS seven in band speaking is a very good score. So well done on achieving that. To get to a band eight, there's a bit more work involved. A band eight person maybe has a very wide range of language, a lot of vocabulary that's very uncommon and very sophisticated with good collocations. The sentences are consistently complex and varied and a very high accuracy with the grammar. The pronunciation is very well sustained in terms of the rhythm and stress, and the fluency is also very good where the ideas are readily developed without any effort.

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Where has IELTS taken you?

So my IELTS got me to my postgraduate studies. After finishing my bachelors and masters in Croatia, I passed IELTS, which got me into my PhD studies. I managed to start my PhD in the United Kingdom and now I'm halfway through. I'm in my second year and I wouldn't change the experience for anything in the world. My English got so much better since I arrived to the UK, and sometimes it's really hard to remember words in my native language as I use English every day.

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Does punctuation matter?

Punctuation is very important in the IELTS test. First of all, in the writing test, you'll need to have good accuracy with your punctuation, including things like apostrophes, full stops, commas and also in the listening test and reading tests it's important to transcribe the data correctly. For example, how we separate 1000. We would use a comma, but in some languages people use a full stop or a point. This would be marked as incorrect. So please be very careful with your punctuation.

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How to improve from Band 5 to 6 in IELTS Writing?

If you scored band five in the IELTS writing test and you'd like to improve your score an extra band to band six, just make sure that you haven't lost any marks unnecessarily. So, for example, have you written at least 150 words for task one and 250 words for task two? In task one, in the academic test, did you include an overview? And also, have you included all the main features in your writing? Make sure that you also have a very clear position in your essay as well.

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How to improve from Band 8 to 9 in IELTS Writing?

Achieving a band eight in IELTS writing is very good. To go that one step further and achieve a band nine, you need to think about how well your ideas have been developed and extended. Pretty much at a band nine level, there's nothing much more you can add to a response. Make sure that you are accurate at all times with your vocabulary and your grammar, and make sure that your paragraphing is properly formed. A clear topic sentence with good supporting ideas. Also make sure you've got good referencing so you don't repeat language.

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How to reduce stress on test day?

If you're feeling stressed on your IELTS test day, that's a perfectly normal feeling, by the way, but I guess everyone deals with it differently. You could try perhaps some breathing exercises. You can perhaps get familiar with your test centre. It might be worth visiting the test centre the day before, in case you haven't been there, so you're more familiar with the surroundings and therefore more comfortable.

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Do you have any advice for Speaking Part 3?

In part three of the IELTS speaking test, the questions can be a little bit more challenging because they're not so personal, they're much broader. So it's very important to try and develop and extend your ideas as much as you can. Perhaps one thing you can do is look at the question from two sides. You may also want to provide an example as a way of extending your ideas.

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Is it okay to use slang in your Speaking test?

In the IELTS speaking test some people wonder whether it's okay to use slang. Some people worry that it might come across as being informal. My view on the matter is that it's okay to use slang as long as you use it in an appropriate way. First of all, make sure that it's polite enough to use and also that it's appropriate to the context.

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Can smiling and laughing get me a better IELTS score?

When it comes to smiling or laughing in your IELTS speaking test, that's perfectly fine. You can do that if you like. But smiling and laughing, these two things are not part of the IELTS speaking test criteria, which are fluency, vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. So as you can see, smiling and laughing don't belong in any of those four categories, so they can't actually help you get a better score.

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What if I pause or mispronounce words during the Speaking test?

In the IELTS speaking test mispronunciation and pausing are both important areas. Let's look at mispronunciation first. It's important to try and use the sounds of English appropriately, but it is okay to have an accent. When it comes to pausing, that can affect you in two ways. One, it can affect your fluency, but it can also affect your pronunciation in terms of your rhythm and intonation.

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How to improve from Band 5 to 6 in IELTS Reading?

Moving from a band five to a band six in the IELTS reading test can be achieved just with a lot of extra practise. Make sure that you become good at reading in for specific detail, as well as training yourself to skim and scan for particular elements in the article. So, for example, is trying to prioritise your questions. If you see a name or something that's capitalised, search for that in the article as a good starting point for your answer.

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How to improve from Band 7 to 8 in IELTS Writing?

Moving from a band seven to a band eight in the IELTS writing test does require a bit more practise. You also need to make sure that you've improved your grammar accuracy and that your range of sentences is quite varied. Make sure that your grammar accuracy is also much better, including things like punctuation as well. Also make sure that your ideas are fully developed and extended and well supported.

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Will I get better IELTS results if I sit the test in my home country?

Some people might wonder if they can achieve a better band score if they take the IELTS test back in their home country, but actually it doesn't make any difference in terms of the examiners. They are all trained in exactly the same way and use the same criteria. Also, the tests that you take are also very similar because the reading test, for example, will have 40 questions in 1 hour. The writing test will have two tasks to complete in 1 hour. So the actual test items are not different and the examiners are not different. They will rate you in exactly the same way regardless of where they are.

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Do you have any advice for Writing Task 1?

In task one of the IELTS writing test there are a few things I would recommend that you do to try to avoid losing marks unnecessarily. For example, make sure that you write at least 150 words, that you use paragraphs, you use statistics and data from the graphs, make comparisons, and of course, have an overview. Above all, make sure you write more than 150 words.

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As a native speaker, what mistakes am I likely to make in Writing?

That is a good question. I've talked to many native speakers who cannot understand why they did not get the score they expected, and I'll go through some of those reasons. One, some native speakers think their handwriting is good and it isn't. That's a problem if you're using a pencil and paper too. Some native speakers think that their spelling is good and it isn't. A lot of native speakers don't understand how to use paragraphs very well or punctuation. That's a problem. But the big one, I think, is that native speakers think that if they write, simply write a coherent essay, it doesn't really matter that they answer the question fully, and they need to answer the question fully in order to get a good score in that first criterion. So if you only get a five or six for that first criterion, and the other ones eight and nine, then you're only going to end up with something like a band seven, where you really should be getting an eight or nine.

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How is Computer-delivered IELTS marked?

Marked by two examiners, the same way that the paper, a pencil and paper test is marked. So there's no difference. The computer test is marked by flesh and blood examiners for the writing, two of them, a minimum of two, it could be more. Same as the computer and pencil and paper.

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How to improve from Band 4 to 5 in IELTS Listening?

If you've achieved a band four in the IELTS listing test and you're hoping to increase to a band five. There are a few things that you can perhaps do with your practise. It's important to make sure that your spelling is improved. You know, practice, for example, try to make note of any spelling errors that you make and improve on that. Also, get used to listening to a variety of dialogues and conversations where people take turns. And also try to listen to lectures where the speaker speaks at length or, you know, five, six, seven minutes. Being able to concentrate for that length of time.

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How to improve from Band 4 to 5 in IELTS Writing?

To move from band four to band five in your IELTS writing test, there are a couple of things to take into consideration. First of all, make sure that you use or attempt to use complex sentences in your writing. Try to be as accurate as you can. Try to avoid some basic mistakes with your grammar. Also with your vocabulary, you should be starting to think about a wider range of vocabulary, perhaps some words that are less common, and also make sure that you cover all the requirements of the task to avoid losing marks unnecessarily.

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How to improve from Band 4 to 5 in IELTS Reading?

To improve from a band four in the IELTS reading test to a band five in your practise, there are a couple of things to think about. For example, your vocabulary range. Now, paraphrasing is very important in the reading test, being able to find meaning with paraphrased words. So keep a good vocabulary list as well. And of course, doing as much practise as you can is important. It doesn't have to be with IELTS practise tests, but any kind of general reading as well.

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How to improve from Band 5 to 6 in IELTS Speaking?

In the IELTS speaking test, if you're looking to move from a band five to a band six, there are a few things to take into consideration. The first one is with regards to your fluency. It's being able to develop and extend your ideas more readily. Also, you'll be able to have a wider range of vocabulary in your answer to talk about topics in a little bit more depth. Make sure also that you have good complex sentences in your answer. And with good fluency also comes good rhythm and intonation as well in your pronunciation.

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Can you tell me about the Speaking Band scores/Assessment criteria?

In regards to the criteria or the assessment criteria in the IELTS speaking test, there are four main categories, fluency and coherence, vocabulary, grammatical range and accuracy, and pronunciation. And each one is worth 25% of your score. So it's being able to speak fluently without pauses or breaks. It's having a range of vocabulary, your grammar accuracy and the complex sentences that you use, and also your pronunciation, the sounds of English and things like rhythm and intonation.

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How to improve from Band 6 to 7 in IELTS Speaking?

If you've scored band six in your IELTS speaking test, that's fantastic. That's a good band score. If you're aiming for that extra band higher at a band seven, make sure with your fluency, for example, that you develop your ideas more readily and more easily. Make sure your vocabulary range is wider. You're starting to use less common vocabulary. Also, when it comes to grammar, make sure that you have a good variety of sentences, they're quite complex and your error rate is a bit lower than, say, a band six.

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What sort of questions will I receive in Speaking Part 1?

Now the type of questions you would expect in part one of the IELTS speaking test are more about yourself, personal questions or things that you are familiar about. You might be asked about something in your town or in your country or in your culture. So it could be something about things that you like, things that you prefer, how common something is perhaps. And you would talk about perhaps two or three topics like that.

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I scored a band 4 in the IELTS Speaking. How do I score a band 5 next time?

To improve from a band four to a band five. In the IELTS speaking test, there are a few things to take into consideration. First of all, with regards to your grammar, try to make sentences a bit more complex, but at least make sure that your basic sentence structures are fairly accurate. Watch out for basic common mistakes. Also, be prepared to try and develop and extend your ideas. Try not to hesitate and pause so often, and also make sure that your pronunciation of the individual sounds of English are improved.

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If I express an opinion different to the examiner, could I lose marks?

In the IELTS speaking test, if you present an opinion that's different to what the examiner says or suggests, that's perfectly fine. You don't lose marks for your opinions. You actually gain marks for things like fluency, vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation. So don't worry about whether your opinion differs. Just worry about the content and if it's relevant to the question.

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Can you tell me about the Reading band scores and assessment criteria?

When it comes to the band score in the IELTS reading test, it's very similar to the listening test in that you get a raw score out of 40 and that is converted into a band score. Although there is a difference between the IELTS general and academic tests in reading, in that you need a higher score in the general test to have the same band score as the academic test. So perhaps 25 out of 40 would give you a band six in the academic test, it would give you approximately 5.5 in the general test.

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Can you tell me about the Listening band scores and assessment criteria?

In the IELTS listening test, you first of all start with a raw score out of 40. You may have noticed there are 40 questions and each question is worth one point each. This then converts into a band score. So, for example, a score of 39 or 40 is typically a band nine. Something in the mid twenties, for example, would be roughly a band six, depending on each test.

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Can you tell me about the Speaking band scores and assessment criteria?

In regards to the criteria or the assessment criteria in the IELTS speaking test, there are four main categories. Fluency and coherence, vocabulary, grammatical range and accuracy and pronunciation. And each one is worth 25% of your score. So it's being able to speak fluently without pauses or breaks. It's having a range of vocabulary, your grammar accuracy and the complex sentences that you use, and also your pronunciation, the sounds of English and things like rhythm and intonation.

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Can you tell me about the Writing band scores and assessment criteria?

In the IELTS writing test there are four main criteria, each worth 25%. There's grammar range and accuracy, and also vocabulary, which is similar to the IELTS speaking test. However, there's also task response or task achievement and coherence and cohesion. So look at how well you answer the question. Make sure you finish all the criteria, your paragraphing, your linking devices and connectors. These are all important things.

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Can you explain the Pronunciation criteria in IELTS Speaking?

When it comes to the pronunciation criteria in the IELTS speaking test, some people think it's just about the sounds making the right sounds in English, but that's only part of it. You also have to make sure that you focus on your rhythm and intonation, and also look at your word and sentence stress as well.

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Can you explain the Lexical resource criteria in IELTS Writing?

The lexical resource criteria in the IELTS writing test focuses on your vocabulary use. So to achieve a higher band, you need to make sure that you use a good range of vocabulary. Try to use words that are perhaps less common or more formal or academic. Also, think about your collocation, that is, words that belong together. For example, you could say something like 'have a preference for'. These four words together, make a collocation. So that's some of the things that we look at in the lexical resource criteria.

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Can you explain the Lexical resource criteria in IELTS Speaking?

The lexical resource criteria in the IELTS speaking test is very similar to the writing criteria, actually. We look for things like your range of vocabulary collocations that you use and whether the language you use is common or uncommon. And it's also important here not to try to repeat a lot of the vocabulary as well. Show a good range.

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Can you explain the Grammatical range and accuracy criteria in IELTS Writing?

When it comes to the grammatical range and accuracy criteria in the IELTS writing test, it's very important to remember there are two aspects here. One is the accuracy in your grammar, but it's also important to think about the range of structures that you use. Try not to be repetitive. Make sure that your sentences are complex, especially if you want to achieve a higher band. But don't worry, it is okay to make some errors in the higher bands, but just be careful with the quantity of them. That's all.

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Can you explain the Grammatical range and accuracy criteria in IELTS Speaking?

The grammatical range and accuracy criteria in the IELTS speaking test is worth 25% of your score. So here we're looking at not just your accuracy, that is, with the errors that you make or the type of errors that you make, but it's also important to have a good variety of structures. Don't repeat yourself too much. Also, make sure that your sentences are complex as well, especially if you are looking for a higher band score.

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Can you explain the Fluency and coherence criteria in IELTS Speaking?

When it comes to the fluency and coherence criteria in the IELTS speaking test, there are a few things to look out for. First of all, this is where you need to try to develop and extend your ideas. We also look at things about your pausing and your hesitation when you're searching for words. This is also the section where we look at connectors and cohesive devices as well.

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Can you explain the Coherence and cohesion criteria in IELTS Writing?

The coherence and cohesion criteria in the IELTS writing test is worth 25% of your score. It would look at things like paragraph development, for example, if you have a clear topic sentence. Also looks at connectors and cohesive devices. Do you repeat a lot of words or do you reference them? Use words like it they or them for example. It also looks at how well your ideas flow and continue throughout the response.

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What does it mean if an examiner interrupts me during my Speaking test?

If an examiner interrupts you in the IELTS speaking test, it's perfectly fine. There's no need to panic. The examiner has to stick to a very strict schedule. So for example, in part one of the IELTS speaking test, it's strictly no more than five minutes. So they just perhaps want to move on to the next stage. Sometimes if you've given a full response to a question, perhaps they might want to move on and ask you something else and get some other ideas that you that you have.

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What sort of questions will I receive in Speaking Part 3?

In part three of the IELTs speaking test, the type of questions you would expect would not be personal type like you would find in part one or part two. These are more abstract questions, looking at topics and issues more deeply. So, for example, you might be asked to offer your opinion about something, perhaps talk about the advantages and disadvantages of a particular issue, or even the cause or the reason behind a trend, or the effect of it, or even a solution to a problem, even identifying particular aspects of an issue as well.

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Where can I use idioms in my IELTS test?

When it comes to using idioms in the IELTS test, it's perfectly fine to use it, say, in the speaking test, idioms can be quite useful because quite often they are very uncommon. But just make sure that the context is right. In the IELTs writing test, I think for task one in the general test you may be asked to write a letter to a friend, in which case that's an informal task. So in this case it's okay to use idioms.

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Will I lose marks if I don't speak in an Australian, British or American accent?

When it comes to accent in the IELTS speaking test, don't worry if you use an american accent or a british accent or an australian accent. I guess main thing is to just try to be consistent. English has no standard accent, so that's perfectly fine if you have one particular accent from an english speaking country.

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Do I need to use different sentence structures to get a good score in Grammatical range and accuracy?

Yeah, the point of having a range of grammar is that you are showing the examiner that you have a rather deeper understanding of English. Now, it's not always appropriate to use the passive voice, for example. In fact, Bill Gates doesn't like you're using it at all. You might notice when you're using word that there'll be a little squiggly line coming under a passive, and they'll suggest you use the active voice. But in some, for example, a process in academic task, one where something is being done to something else, then it's quite natural to use the passive. Think about... I'm glad that this person mentioned conditionals, because this is a good example of a complex sentence. You know, if the government does this, then there will be benefits for society. But think also about relative clauses. This is a thing which needs to be corrected. Many people who are benefiting from this will find another solution. Think about those things. Think about participle clauses. There are many different structures. You don't have to go wild because, just talk to Ernest Hemingway, Jimmy. He will tell you that a simple sentence is perfectly good, but for the sake of the test, show the examiner a little bit of complexity as well.

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Both sides of the argument or just one in an opinion essay?

It will depend a little bit on. Well, it will depend a lot on what the question is. So if it is, discuss both views and give your own opinion. It would make sense to give equal weight to each view. And that would probably be something like an introduction, introductory paragraph, dealing with the first view in the second paragraph, dealing with the second view in the third paragraph, and finishing with your opinion. Four paragraphs. If it is a question like to what extent do you agree you don't have to give an opposing view at all. You can simply say, yes, I agree with this, or I disagree with this, or I partly agree with this for these reasons, and then conclude. So really, there is no hard and fast rule about writing or organising an essay. It is, but the most important thing is that it is logical and that it answers all parts of the question. So just think about those two things. Is your organisation logical? And have you covered all points?

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Can you explain the Task response criteria in IELTS Writing?

One of the key features of the task response criteria in the IELTS writing test, especially for the higher bands, is about how well you develop your ideas and opinions, using examples to extend and develop your thoughts. Also in this criteria, this is where people perhaps, maybe would lose marks. For example, if you are off topic, or perhaps if your word length is not enough, you would have marks deducted here.

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What sort of questions will I receive in Speaking Part 2?

When it comes to the type of questions in part two of the IELTS speaking test, you'll find that they are still quite personal or relatable to yourself like it is in part one. You may be asked to describe a past experience, something that you went through before. You could be asked about something you do at the moment. It could be like a routine or a habit. You may be asked to describe a person that you knew or you know or you've heard of. And sometimes you might be asked about intentions or plans for the future.

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Do you have any advice for Writing Part 2?

When it comes to task two in the IELTS writing test, some suggestions I have for you would be to ensure, first of all, that you write at least 250 words. That's the minimum requirement. Make sure that you write in paragraphs and use a good range of connectors. Make sure your grammar is complex, as accurate as you can, and use a good range of vocabulary. Importantly, when it comes to the task, make sure that you clearly mark your position and extend and develop your ideas.

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Can you tell me a little bit more about True/False/Not Given?

True, false or not given an interesting group of questions, aren't they? Especially the not given response. My advice is to not focus on the not given choice to begin with, just look at the true or false option first. If the answer is true, then the information in the article matches the sentence. For the answer to be false, it has to contradict the sentence, be opposite or different. In the case of not given, this is your last option, I feel, when you cannot prove if the statement is correct or incorrect. So basically there's no evidence to say whether it's true or false.

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Do you have any advice for Writing Part 1?

In task one of the IELTS writing test. There are a few things I would recommend that you do to try to avoid losing marks unnecessarily. For example, make sure that you write at least 150 words, that you use paragraphs, you use statistics and data from the graphs, make comparisons, and of course, have an overview. Above all, make sure you write more than 150 words.

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How can mispronunciation or pausing during my Speaking test impact my score?

In the IELTS speaking test, mispronunciation and pausing are both important areas. Let's look at mispronunciation first. It's important to try and use the sounds of English appropriately, but it is okay to have an accent. When it comes to pausing, that can affect you in two ways. One, it can affect your fluency, but it can also affect your pronunciation in terms of your rhythm and intonation.

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Should I write more than the word limit in my Writing test?

If you want to write over the word minimum in the IELTS writing test, that is more than 150 words in task one and more than 250 words in task two, that's perfectly fine, especially if you're wanting to achieve a higher band score like band seven or band eight, where you want to show the examiner more range in your language choices. However, just make sure that you've got a good quality in your writing as well. So volume does not mean I always mean a higher band score. You also need quality as well.

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Is it okay to use slang in the Speaking section?

In the IELTS speaking test some people wonder whether it's okay to use slang. Some people worry that it might come across as being informal. My view on the matter is that it's okay to use slang as long as you use it in an appropriate way. First of all, make sure that it's polite enough to use, and also that it's appropriate to the context.

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Is Speaking Part 3 harder than Speaking Part 1 and Part 2?

Now, if you want to compare the difficulty between part three and part one of the IELTS speaking test, there can be a difference for some people because part one mainly focuses on personal experiences or very familiar topics, for example like public transport or your hometown. Part three, on the other hand, looks at topics a little bit more deeply, more abstract. So in some ways that can be more challenging. But at the same time, perhaps part one can be difficult as well. If you come across a topic that you haven't met before.

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I scored a band 8 in the IELTS Writing. How do I score a band 9 next time?

Achieving a band eight in IELTS writing is very good. To go that one step further and achieve a band nine, you need to think about how well your ideas have been developed and extended. Pretty much at a band nine level, there's nothing much more you can add to a response. Make sure that you are accurate at all times with your vocabulary and your grammar, and make sure that your paragraphing is properly formed, a clear topic sentence with good supporting ideas. Also, make sure you've got good referencing so you don't repeat language.

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I scored a band 8 in the IELTS Speaking. How do I score a band 9 next time?

Now, moving from band eight to band nine in the IELTS speaking test does require a lot more work. You have to be able to fully develop your responses and talk about a variety of topics in depth. You have to have a good range of language in terms of vocabulary and grammar, and you also need a high accuracy rate when it comes to those two criteria. Make sure that your pronunciation has good rhythm, intonation and stress, and that you pronounce all the sounds in English clearly, although it's fine to have a slight accent, but otherwise, these are all the kind of main things we look at in a band nine.

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I scored a band 7 in the IELTS Speaking. How do I score a band 8 next time?

An IELTS seven. In band speaking is a very good score, so well done on achieving that. To get to a band eight, there's a bit more work involved. A band eight person maybe has a very wide range of language, a lot of vocabulary that's very uncommon and very sophisticated with good collocations. The sentences are consistently complex and varied and a very high accuracy with the grammar. The pronunciation is very well sustained in terms of the rhythm and stress, and the fluency is also very good where the ideas are readily developed without any effort.

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I scored a band 7 in the IELTS Writing. How do I score a band 8 next time?

Moving from a band seven to a band eight in the IELTs writing test does require a bit more practise. You also need to make sure that you've improved your grammar accuracy and that your range of sentences is quite varied. Make sure that your grammar accuracy is also much better, including things like punctuation as well. Also make sure that your ideas are fully developed and extended and well supported.

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I scored a band 6 in the IELTS Writing. How do I score a band 7 next time?

Now, going from a band six in the IELTS writing test and trying to achieve a band seven, there are a few things you need to think about. One is about how well you develop and extend your ideas. A band seven response tends to be much more developed. You've got clear topic sentence in your body, paragraphs for example, and when it comes to grammar and vocabulary, you've got a wider range, especially with vocabulary that's less common.

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I scored a band 6 in the IELTS Speaking. How do I score a band 7 next time?

If you've scored band six in your IELTS speaking test, that's fantastic. That's a good band score. If you're aiming for that extra band higher at a band seven, make sure with your fluency, for example, that you develop your ideas more readily and more easily. Make sure your vocabulary range is wider. You're starting to use less common vocabulary. Also, when it comes to grammar, make sure that you have a good variety of sentences. They're quite complex and your error rate is a bit lower than, say, a band six.

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I scored a band 5 in the IELTS Writing. How do I score a band 6 next time?

If you scored band five in the IELTS writing test and you'd like to improve your score an extra band to band six, just make sure that you haven't lost any marks unnecessarily. So, for example, have you written at least 150 words for task one and 250 words for task two? In task one? In the academic test, did you include an overview? And also have you included all the main features in your writing? Make sure that you also have a very clear position in your essay as well.

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I scored a band 5 in the IELTS Speaking. How do I score a band 6 next time?

In the IELTS speaking test, if you're looking to move from a band five to a band six, there are a few things to take into consideration. The first one is with regards to your fluency. It's being able to develop and extend your ideas more readily. Also, you'll be able to have a wider range of vocabulary in your answer to talk about topics in a little bit more depth. Make sure also that you have good complex sentences in your answer. And with good fluency also comes good rhythm and intonation as well in your pronunciation.

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I scored a band 5 in the IELTS Reading. How do I score a band 6 next time?

Moving from a band five to a band six in the IELTS reading test can be achieved just with a lot of extra practise. Make sure that you become good at reading in full for specific detail, as well as training yourself to skim and scan for particular elements in the article. So, for example, it's trying to prioritise your questions. If you see a name or something that's capitalised, search for that in the article as a good starting point for your answer.

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I scored a band 5 in the IELTS Listening. How do I score a band 6 next time?

To improve from a band five to a band six in the IELTs listening test, it's important to try and practise as much general listening as you can. So, for example, listening to more monologues such as news broadcasts or TED talks, but also in conversations and dialogues as well. With band six, it's also important to be able to follow lectures at length and be able to concentrate for an extended period of time. So that's an important thing to do in your practise.

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I scored a band 4 in the IELTS Reading. How do I score a band 5 next time?

To improve from a band four in the IELTS reading test to a band five in your practise, there are a couple of things to think about. For example, your vocabulary range. Now, paraphrasing is very important in the reading test, being able to find meaning with paraphrased words. So keep a good vocabulary list as well. And of course, doing as much practise as you can is important. It doesn't have to be with IELTS practise tests, but any kind of general reading as well.

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I scored a band 4 in the IELTS Listening. How do I score a band 5 next time?

If you've achieved a band four in the IELTS listing test and you're hoping to increase to a band five, there are a few things that you can perhaps do with your practise. It's important to make sure that your spelling is improved. You know, practice, for example, try to make note of any spelling errors that you make and improve on that. Also, get used to listening to a variety of dialogues and conversations where people take turns. And also try to listen to lectures where the speaker speaks at length for, you know, five, six, seven minutes. Being able to concentrate for that length of time.

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If I smile and laugh, will I achieve a better result in my Speaking test?

When it comes to smiling or laughing in your IELTS speaking test, that's perfectly fine. You can do that if you like, but smiling and laughing these two things are not part of the IELTS speaking test criteria, which are fluency, vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. So, as you can see, smiling and laughing don't belong in any of those four categories, so they can't actually help you get a better score.

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I scored a band 4 in the IELTS Writing. How do I score a band 5 next time?

To move from band four to band five in your IELTS writing test, there are a couple of things to take into consideration. First of all, make sure that you use attempt, or attempt to use complex sentences in your writing. Try to be as accurate as you can. Try to avoid some basic mistakes with your grammar. Also with your vocabulary, you should be starting to think about a wider range of vocabulary, perhaps some words that are less common, and also make sure that you cover all the requirements of the task to avoid losing marks unnecessarily.

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What can you tell me about Listening Part 1?

In section one of the IELTS listening test, you will have ten questions, of course, and they'll mostly be related to personal information and details, things like names, addresses, phone numbers, locations. Of course, spelling is very important, so make sure that you know how to spell all your dates correctly. When it comes to unusual names, though, the speaker will spell them out for you if it's an unusual surname for example.

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What if I don't have an opinion on a certain topic during my Speaking test?

If you're asked a question in the IELTS speaking test and you can't form an opinion or don't have an opinion about the question or the topic, you're still expected to say something, so perhaps you can speculate. If they ask you something about taking a ferry, for example, as a type of public transport, and you've never done that before, you could speculate and explain to the examiner, well, look, I've never been on a ferry before, but I imagine it would be like this. So use your language and speculate. If you don't have an opinion.

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Don't say

Don't say let's go to dinner. I invite you. Do say let's go to dinner. I'll treat you or it's my treat. Invite is used in English with when you want to ask someone to go to an event with you it does not mean you will pay for them. For example, I invite you to my party. I want you to come to my party. If you have some food that you want to share with somebody. You also do not say I invite you. You should say help yourself. Do you want some? Go ahead.

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Teach me IELTS #3

Me baby, take me out. I got you. Go. I like making cake. It is my passion to bake and create scrumptious pastries for everybody. And it is my dream that one day I will own a bakery.

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Teach me IELTS #2

I got you. Go. I love this. I would love a canine companion since they are adorable and incredibly loyal.

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How to answer IELTS questions like a pro #2

How to answer IO questions like a pro. Now question number one. What is it? Do you like art? Don't say yes, I do. Say I love art. I'm a huge fan of drawing and poetry. In fact, I often paint in my free time. Number two, do you like running? Don't say no I don't say I'm not a big fan of running so I play badminton instead because it is way more competitive.

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Vocabulary to talk about where you're from

Vocabulary to talk about where you're from, born and bred the place where you were born and raised as a child. Hectic, a busy place. It's home to to describe what there is or who lives in a place. And finally cosmopolitan. A place that has a lot of things or people from all around the world. So tell me, where are you from? I was born and bred in Oxford it's quite hectic in the city centre also it's home to students from around the world so I'd say it's quite cosmopolitan.

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The silent B in English

Hello there. Let's talk about the silent b in English so the letter b is silent after the letter M for example, thumb, bum, dumb, limb, numb and plumber and it's also not pronounced before the letter t. I mean usually, you know for example, debt, doubt, subtle that's it.

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Teach me IELTS #1

I got you. Go. What would you like to do in the future? Right now I don't have any long term plan but for the foreseeable future I would like to excel at my job and be financially independent.

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How to answer IELTS questions like a pro #1

Doctor le Goha IELTS how to answer IELTS questions like a pro when the examiner asks you do you like fish? It's a real question. Don't say yes, I do say I love fish. They are incredibly delicious. Salmon sashimi is my absolute favourite. When the examiner asks, what do you like to do in your free time? Don't say, I like to sleep. Say, when I have free time, I usually take a nap because it is great for stress relief and I can be more focused when I wake up.

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Vocabulary to talk about school

Vocabulary to talk about school. Teacher's pet, a student who is liked by the teacher the most. Mediocre average. Revise to review something you already studied before in preparation for an exam. And learn by heart, to memorise something. So tell me, what were you like at school? I mean, did you like school? Yeah, I did. School was really fun. I was a bit of a teacher's pet. Although my grades were still pretty mediocre. I spent so much time revising my french exam, I should have learnt the verbs by heart. Au revoir.

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Vocabulary to describe what you do for a living

Vocabulary to describe what you do for a living. To commute, to travel from your house to work. Colleagues, the people who you work with. To work remotely, to work at home or another place away from the office. And to be laid off. To lose your job for a neutral reason. So tell me, what do you do? Well, I used to be an IT technician, but I was laid off last year. Now I'm working in a marketing agency. I usually commute to work on my bicycle. However, sometimes they ask me to work remotely. My colleagues are the best. They're so friendly.

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Comparing Fluency & Coherence for Bands 5 to 8 in IELTS Speaking Part 3

In Japan, what would you say was the typical balance of leisure time and work time? Actually, I've never worked in Japan, so I don't know exactly, but I think almost japanese businessman has to work very hard every day. So just for holiday, for example, on just Sunday they can spend their time for hobby, I think. Do you think people have enough leisure time generally in Japan? It depends on people, I think. And what about the future? Future? Yes. Will people have more time or less time? Less time, I think even less? Yes, even less. Almost japanese people like maybe like working, I think could be. What's the balance between leisure and work in your country? You see, when we speak about, for example, Moscow, of course, in Moscow people usually work long hours. Long hours, really. And they are overworked maybe sometimes. But on the other side they had a lot of possibilities to a lot of entertainment. There are a lot of casinos, for example, shows, cinemas and everything. Do you think this will change in the future? I'm not sure that it will change in nearest future. I think the schedule of work will be even stronger, harder, tougher. What is the balance between leisure and work like in your country? I think people work too much. Okay. More than the leisure. Leisure. Why do you think that? Why do you think people work too much? I think because I think salaries are not that high and people need to work a lot to provide themselves, I think. And also think, on the other hand, professional people just want to go higher, higher in the job ladder. Will this will change in the future or will it always be like this? I think it's changing now. People realise that you can be productive without staying all day, doing things all the time. You mentioned that the work leisure balance in Germany is perhaps a little bit out of balance. Can you tell me more about that? Yeah, I mean, the regular working hours would be eight to 9 hours a day. But nowadays competition is quite big because of the unemployment. So everybody is really putting a lot of overtime in their work and most of the time probably don't get paid for it. And leisure time is increasingly, of course, getting less and less. And so people are definitely looking forward to the holidays or their weekends to enjoy family life. But I think family life, isn't that what it was before? Because everybody is so focused on their careers and to keep their jobs and have a good income and survive basically in the system. Do you think this will continue in the future? Well, probably next ten years till the economy again picking up and our social welfare system is getting better again because it was quite good years ago, but the last ten years, I would say it really declined a bit.

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Five commonly mispronounced words in English

Hey, can you say these five words in English? Recipe, receipt, women, sword, saddle. That's it.

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How is IELTS scored?

IELTS scores are scored on the nine band scale. Test takers receive an overall band score as well as an individual band score for each test. Listening, reading, writing, and speaking in both the listening and reading section. Each section contains 40 questions. Each correct item is awarded one mark. Band scores ranging from one to nine are then awarded to test takers based on their achieved mark. In both the writing and speaking section of the IELTS test examiners look at four different detailed assessment criteria to award a band score. For writing the four assessment criteria task achievement and response, coherence and cohesion, lexical resource, grammatical range and accuracy. For speaking, the four assessment criteria are. fluency and coherence, lexical resource, grammatical range and accuracy pronunciation. IELTS band scores are valid for up to two years, with no limit on how many times you can use them. To learn more about IELTS band scores, visit IELTSessentials.com.

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IELTS Speaking hears accents

Everyday life in a new place can be daunting. Each person has a unique voice, so sometimes misunderstandings happen. Who you take your english language test with matters. Choose a test where a person asks the questions. They focus on you, one on one, so they can understand you regardless of your accent or volume. And don't forget, they can repeat a question if you need them to. So when deciding who to take your english language test with, choose the test where you'll be heard. The test that ensures you'll be understood. Choose IELTS. We hear you.

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IELTS Listening tips: Four sections

IELTS listening tips - four sections. Section one, practise the pronunciation of numbers, especially the ones that are similar. For example, 15, 50. Section two, you'll often have to describe a map or a plan. Learn vocabulary to describe location. For example, in the northeast, runs along, opposite. Section three, practise listening to a conversation of three or four people. For example, find a tv series. Listen for five minutes and make notes on who said what. Section four, learn signposting language. For example, first I will, and then after that, we will. And finally I'll.

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Five most useful phrasal verbs

Five most useful phrasal verbs. Carry on. Get away. Get over. Hold on. Watch out. That's it.

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7 steps to help you reach a band 7: IELTS Writing Task 2

Hey, IELTS test takers. We're here today to give you seven steps to help you reach a band seven on IELTS writing task two. You're welcome to pause the video and read as we move through the essay example. lets begin. Step one, answer all parts of the question. First of all, you need to show the examiner that you have answered all parts of the question. How many parts are in this question? Yes, thats right. Three. View one and two and your own opinion. You must do three things to achieve a higher band showing the examiner that you are addressing all parts of the task. Present one view and then the other view and then present your opinion. Step two, present a clear position. You must say what your position is on the prompt so the examiner knows what you think about the question. Step three, structure your essay. Essays need paragraphs to show the reader where to start, which ideas are important, and that your essay is concluding. Make it easy for the examiner by leaving a space between each paragraph. If you look at this essay, you will see the clear and logical structure with a clear idea developed within each paragraph. Step four, use linking devices. Your sentences and paragraphs need to be linked together using appropriate linkers and and phrases that help to make your answer logical and clear. Look at this essay. You will see how the linking devices help make the essay sound logical to the reader. It is the glue needed to stick it all together. Step five, use a range of vocabulary. When you write, use words that you can spell and that you understand. It is better to choose words that are correct and clear rather than more complicated words that you don't really understand. The most important thing is to communicate clearly to the reader so they can follow your thoughts and ideas. Use words and phrases that go naturally together or collocation. Use phrases that show you understand how to use the phrasal verbs and idiomatic language. Always check for spelling errors and typos. Step six, use a range of grammatical structures accurately. In order to reach a band seven for GRA, you need to have frequent, error free sentences. Simple and complex sentences. Make sure you know the mistakes you usually make and practise those structures, for example, articles, subject verb agreement, prepositions, and plurals. Practise writing complex sentences and remember to use punctuation. Step seven, check your essay. Check the following by asking yourself these questions. Did I answer all parts? Did I use paragraphs? Did I use linkers? Is my spelling correct? And did I use a range of vocabulary? Did I use complex sentence structures? Did I use punctuation? Did I check my work? If you follow these seven steps we've helped you with today, you'll be on your way to a band seven for IELTS writing task two.

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7 Mistakes preventing a band 7 or higher: IELTS Writing Task 2

220 Hey IELTS test takers, we're here today to tell you about seven mistakes that could be preventing you from scoring a band seven or higher in IELTS writing task two. You're welcome to pause the video and read as we move through the essay example, test takers sometimes wonder why they scored the way they did in the IELTS writing test and become frustrated with their writing band score. We are going to show you seven mistakes that test takers make that prevent a higher band score. We will also show you the features that the examiner looks at when assessing your essay and deciding the band score. Lets fix this essay and turn it from a band five into a band seven. Mistake number one not enough paragraphs. This is a very easy mistake to make, but it's very costly. Look at what the band descriptors say. In this essay there are only two paragraphs. One very long one with a number of ideas and a one sentence concluding paragraph. Solution, fix paragraphing and make the one sentence paragraph into two sentences. Mistake number two incorrect format. Task two essays must be written in essay format using paragraphs to show your introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion. This is an easy mistake to make if you are rushing. Look at what the band descriptors say. Solution, remove the numbers. Mistake number three partially addressing the question. Take time to read the question carefully and decide how many parts are in the question. For this three part question, you need to discuss both views and give your own opinion. This is a three part question, but they only agreed that wild animals should not be in zoos. They did not give you any reason why animals should be kept in zoos. They only addressed two parts of the question and their opinion is not very clear or supported. Solution, include the other viewpoint. There are good reasons for having zoos and make your opinion clearer. Mistake number four, presenting an unclear position. According to the band descriptors for task response, the writer of this task would have received a band four. To receive a better mark, you need to decide on your position and maintain it throughout the response. Make sure that the examiner knows what you are thinking. Mistake five, spelling errors and typos. Have a look at the band five, six and seven criteria for lexical resource. The writer of this task would have scored between a band five and a band six. To have improved their score, they needed to spell correctly. Remember that a typo is a spelling error. Remember computer delivered IELTS does not have a spellcheck function. Before your IELTS, you should practise commonly misspelt words, for example. Solution, correct your spelling and typos. Mistake six, using inappropriate memorised language phrases and cliches. When they're marking your writing task, the examiner is looking for memorised language, so don't use it. Memorised language is easy to identify, so use your own words and avoid overused phrases like these. Solution, remove memorised language and use your own words to express your ideas clearly. Mistake seven, using surveys and research to support your opinion. For our final step, you need to use real examples and evidence from your own life experience. Examiners cannot check if your research and survey examples are real. They do not support your response appropriately. Remove the false research and include your own examples. With that final mistake fixed, let's take a look at our transformed band seven essay. Thanks for watching. We hope you have learned something about the IELTS writing task two. Avoid these seven mistakes and you'll be on your way to a band seven result for writing task two.

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8 Steps to help you reach a band 8: IELTS Writing Task 2

Hey IELTS test takers. Today we're going to look at eight steps that you can take towards a band eight in IELTS writing task two using the assessment criteria and band descriptors as a guide to what the examiner is looking for. You're welcome to pause the video and read as we move through the essay example. Look at the positive features listed at the band eight level and notice there are barely any negative features mentioned. Our steps today will take you across these four areas, starting with task response and moving through all the other criteria. The focus of this lesson is to look at areas that need more work and can prevent a higher score if not given enough attention. Step one, answer the question relevantly. This means that you should answer what you have been asked. Don't produce an essay that is close to the topic that you have already prepared. You will also need to make sure that your examples and ideas are relevant. If you generalise too much and are not specific enough, this will impact how your ideas come across. Step two, answer all parts of the question. You must read the question carefully and decide how many parts are in it. Then you must effectively answer all parts of the question to reach a band eight and higher. Have a look at the table to see if you understand how many parts are in each IELTS question type and whether you should present your opinion. It is very important to take a clear stance on the statement or premise and to show that your position is clear throughout the essay. Step three, organise your essay logically with clear progression using linking words or phrases. The essay must be organised and easy for the reader to follow. Ideas must be sequenced clearly, starting at the beginning and moving through to a conclusion. If you are asked to present both views and your opinion, state your opinion at the beginning of the essay and then move on to present both views. You can then come back to your own opinion and conclude the essay. This is a logical way to present these ideas. Linking words and phrases which we discussed in our band seven video are used to make your writing more cohesive and coherent. This will help the reader know what is happening as you will be signalling this clearly to them. Step four, organise your essay into paragraphs. Paragraphing shows that your essay is organised into parts. Each paragraph contains a clear topic that is developed. A paragraph must have a minimum of two sentences. Remember p, e e l or peel point. Introduce your topic topic sentence example example that supports your point. Explain why this evidence supports your point. Transition to the next topic paragraph. How many paragraphs should I use? You must use enough paragraphs to clearly show the structure of your response. This will show that you can organise your thoughts and ideas and present them logically. Here are some ideas on how many paragraphs you could include in an essay. Step five, use less common vocabulary and spell it correctly. You will see in the band descriptors that a band eight writer successfully uses uncommon lexical items. When we learn a language, we use common and uncommon terms. Common terms are words and phrases we use every day to refer to personal experience and daily habits. Uncommon terms are used when we discuss specific topics or when we use idiomatic language. Phrasal verbs. Words that are old fashioned and not used in everyday speech should not be used. If you choose a synonym, the meaning must be the same and must not alter the idea being presented. For example, adolescent teenager have close meaning and can be used interchangeably. However, toddler baby have quite different meanings. Collocation is also mentioned in band eight and it is assumed that you know which words go together as well as which words are suitable to use for different topics. If you are discussing child crime, you could use the term minor as this is a legal term used to describe children under the age of 18. If you are using phrasal verbs, make sure you are using the correct preposition as it can change the meaning. Throw out away equals discard throw up equals vomit get sick. Idioms should only be used if you understand them completely and if they fit the topic you are discussing. Step six, don't use memorised language learnt off phrases and examples. As mentioned in step five don't use phrases and memorised sentences. Examiners find them incredibly easy to spot. Overused phrases that are commonly used include linker idioms and cliches. Idioms are generally spoken and not used when writing essays. Proverbs and cliches should also be avoided. Again, they are often used when speaking. These can include. These terms should not be used when writing as they are vague and do not address a task appropriately. You should use clear language and make appropriate word choices that will express your ideas clearly. The table here contains some examples. Step seven, use a variety of complex sentence structures. At band eight, it is expected that you can use a wide range of sentence structures to accurately present your ideas and opinion. You are rated on two areas, range of structures used and accuracy. It is important to use a mix of complex and simple sentences, but remember, complex sentences should not be long and complicated. The most common errors made are highlighted here. Step eight, checklist. Finally, when you're practising your essay, you can use the following checklist to make sure that your writing contains the positive features at a band eight. If you follow these eight steps, you'll be on your way towards a band eight for IELTS writing task two in no time. Thank you for joining us.

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Mistakes that can hold you back from a band 8: IELTS Writing Task 2

Hey IELTS test takers, we're here today to warn you about some mistakes that can hold you back from achieving a band eight on IELTS writing task two. You're welcome to pause the video and read as we move through the essay example. Today we're going to take a deep look at an IELTS writing task two essay and show you what could be done to transform it into a band eight essay. The focus will be on the premise. What is preventing this essay from reaching a band eight and higher? Look at the band eight descriptors. We have highlighted sections in bands seven and eight that match the written performance in the following essay. If your essay matches features in the lower bands, this will prevent you from reaching the higher bands. Finally, remember that we recommend writing at least 250 words for this task. We're going to fix the following essay by focusing on the following three areas, coherence and cohesion, lexical resource and grammatical range and accuracy. Fixing those mistakes would be enough to transform your essay. Have a look at this final version of the essay, which has been edited to correct the article use, spelling errors, word choice errors. Additionally, the paragraphing is clearer and unnecessary language has been deleted. With this transformed essay, the author has satisfied the assessment criteria of a band eight writing task two response. Thank you for watching today. We hope you've learned how to avoid some of the mistakes it's possible to make while aiming for a band eight.

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Advice for achieving a Band 9 in IELTS Reading

My name is Gurleen Pooler, I'm from Jalander City and I'm pursuing my bachelor's in physics honours. My overall band score is eight. Well, the highest scores I got was nine bands in reading section and I think that I did a lot of practise for reading modules and I focused mainly on my time management and I think that's the reason I got higher scores in that. And moreover, I'm really interested in reading novels and I think that's the reason that was the strongest part about me. Well, first of all I was not using much idioms and phrases in my normal conversation so I learned a lot of them and tried to apply them whenever they were required and I think that was some a new thing that I learned and I also learned about managing my time well. I really like to think that it is really convenient. First of all we can choose any desired test date and unlike data paper based IELTS tests, they are really crowded and I really like that there will be just minimum number of students and we can concentrate very better in a better way. And moreover, I really suffer from essential tremors and this is the reason that I could not write well and typing really helped me a lot. Well, like I mentioned before, time management was my biggest weakness. Moreover, I was not much fluent. I used a lot of pauses whenever I used to speak and I think that in listening part also I was not that much attentive whenever there were modules and I used to practise before but these were the parts that I really improved. Moreover, I also got a lot of information when solve the reading modules. They were having great information about articles of different aspects. Well, there's one site that was IELTS list. They were real life comment sections of people that have given it from all around the world. It really helped me because I didn't know different things. For example that we could use a tab key in the computer to go for the next option and we can even use a control plus c and the pasting one that really helped me in managing and scoring good bands. Well, I think that first of all we should take proper sleep because I did not study the day before or on that day and I was really calm and I think that this really helps in staying focused and I think that if we have practise enough like I practised for about a month, then it will give fruitful results. Well, I believe that it really depends upon different person than their perspectives. For example, there are a lot of tips on Internet about how to do different modules but I think that it goes with the individual only. So it is up to you to decide which way works best for you. And I think that there is so much online material that is available and there is nothing that can stop you from scoring good bands.

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